What America Needs Now is a new Mister Rogers

Without question, Mister Rogers was the television personality who had as big an influence on my life as my family. Mister Rogers had a unique way of speaking directly to us, right through the television. He talked to us as peers,  guiding us to be in touch with our emotions, fostering a generation of kids with a curiosity and a vocabulary for talking with others about emotions and things inside. For many, Mister Rogers was the only person who spoke them about these things.

In considering America today, I believe morality and ethics will be the common ground that America and the world will come back to. Truth may be questionable in an era of fake news, but what’s right is always right and decency to others still stands. I’ve probably watched the video of Mister Rogers testifying before a Senate committee determined to stop government funding of PBS a dozen times, and I still tear up every time he recites the lyrics to the song “What Do You Do With The Mad That You Feel?”. To see the way Mister Rogers connected to the most cold hearted politician in such a deeply moving human way shows me there can be hope. There was once a time when an opposing politician would pause, listen, and make an ethical call to benefit children instead of deciding purely along party lines and rhetoric. With so many government programs we have taken for granted on the chopping block, America needs to hold its representatives accountable to listen to us now more than ever.

I never got to meet him, but sharing the name Fred meant that there was a special closeness about the way I identified with Mister Rogers as a child. I think he connected to everyone that way– This 1998 Esquire piece paints a great picture of him, and this piece in Salon is another I found that conjectures about what his positions might have evolved to in our day and age. Over the last few years (through her friendship with Kevin Smith of all people), I have rediscovered someone else from the neighborhood, Betty Aberlin. Her character Lady Aberlin’s royalty was metaphorical for the nobility we all have within ourselves. In this interview, she speaks about the need for more low key and gentle male role models like Mister Rogers, Alan Alda on M*A*S*H, and more recently Obama. I think she’s right.

With the lack of civility in recent public discourse, more than ever we  role models that teach us the importance of mutual respect and living life as a quest for continued personal growth. Kids and adults need to learn to think much more about “we” than “me”, and we all need to eat a slice of humble pie and realize it’s not about divisions, but about coming together, preferably in the real world. Face it, it’s a lot harder to be nasty to one another when we’re not hiding behind our screens. Regardless of what tribes we belong to, it’s time for us to come together as a society with a renewed moral compass, one whose values everyone can agree on. Living with love, integrity, virtue, and respect for others – without a need to impose our views upon them, and holding that the value of the common good is as important as that of our own.

Where are you, Mister Rogers? Come back.
Remind us to keep aiming high.

There’s Something Fishy About The Other Nefertiti

Screen Shot 2016-03-03 at 11.08.30 PMThe New York Times and countless other news outlets picked up on a story that’s been making the rounds of the 3D printing community the last few weeks; Swiping a Priceless Antiquity … With a Scanner and a 3-D Printer tells the story of two artists; Nora Al-Badri and Jan Nikolai Nelles, who apparently succeeded in making a massive digital art heist when they surreptitiously scanned Nefertiti’s bust in Berlin’s Neues Museum. It’s great art commentary with many levels; It talks to issues around digital copy vs. originals, who is allowed to own these copies, and going deeper, questions the museum’s right to own the statue which rightfully should belong to Egypt. By releasing the files for The Other Nefertiti free online as a torrent, the artists have initiated a huge debate with many layers. The 3D Printing community is not without its debate about this work either. The video the artists share that shows them sneaking a kinect scan from beneath Ms. Badri’s scarf raises a lot of questions as to whether the artists even scanned the artifact as they claim.

The video shows the two using a Kinect Xbox controller to capture Nefertiti, and while I have no doubt the artists may have done the Kinect stunt, there is simply no way the scan being distributed was made with a Kinect. Simply put, the scan being distributed which is made of more than 2 million triangles is far too detailed to have been made with that hardware. Even if the device was “hacked” as news reports state, this quality is not achievable with this method. Problems in the story include how the unit was powered (Kinect requires a wall outlet), but even if they carried some kind of battery, Nefertiti is under glass which also causes errors in this method of scanning. Other questions include where was the connected laptop hidden? Then, the video shows Ms. Badri repeatedly covering and recovering the Kinect as she circles Nefertiti. A normal scan would require uninterrupted line of sight of the statue as the scan is happening. In order to get coverage of the top of the headdress, the scanner would have to be held high above the statue, and not at waist level as the video indicates. Maybe multiple scans might have been made from various vantage points and meshed together later, but truthfully the scan is way too high fidelity for the way the Kinect works. The device sprays a grid of points of infrared light over the subject and each point is measured as a distance measurement while the computer software does the math to turn that into a 3D model. Its a fast way to generate a 3d model, but with accuracy that is at best only within a few millimeters.

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I have made over 10,000 Kinect scans. Here we see what is typical of a “good” quality Kinect image capture. Tolerances with this type of scanning are at best within a few millimeters of accuracy. Nowhere near the Sub-millimeter quality of Nefertiti’s scan.

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Nefertiti’s scan is much more accurate that what is possible with a Kinect

So if it wasn’t made with a Kinect, How was this scan created, and why lie about it? When confronted about how the scan was made on the 3D in Review Podcast, Mr. Nelles is vague in his answers and claimed that he and Ms. Badri knew nothing about the device and that some hacker types had set up the hardware for them. The “hackers” then took the data and created the model for them. When asked about the hacker’s technique, Mr. Nelles stated that the hackers had left for New Zealand and were unable to be contacted.

One theory is that the scan is actually generated by Photogrammetry, a technique of capturing images of the sculpture from a variety of angles. The images are then fed into software such as Agisoft Photoscan that analyzes all the images for common points, and generates a 3D model of the subject. Paul Docherty is a researcher who has extensively used photogrammetry to reconstruct historic artifacts and sites, including a model of Nefertiti’s bust using available imagery he gathered online. He catalogued the process in his article 3D Modelling the Bust of Queen Nefertiti, and also spoke on the 3D in Review podcast about his efforts. Mr. Docherty has since gone on to question the Nefertiti Hack scan in his article Nefertiti Hack – Questions regarding the 3D scan of the bust of Nefertiti, in which he agrees that there is no way this scan was captured with a Kinect. So, its possible that the scan could have been made using a series of 45-120 high res images covertly gathered with a cellphone, but if that’s the way it was done, why show the Kinect in the video?

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The last possibility and reigning theory is that Ms. Badri and Mr. Nelles elusive hacker partners are literally real hackers who stole a copy of the high resolution scan from the Museum’s servers. A high resolution scan must exist as a high res 3D printed replica is already available for sale online. Museum officials have dismissed the Other Nefertiti model as “of minor quality”, but that’s not what we are seeing in this highly detailed scan. Perhaps the file was obtained from someone involved in printing the reproduction, or it was a scan made of the reproduction? Indeed, the common belief in online 3D Printing community chatter is that the Kinect “story” is a fabrication to hide the fact that the model was actually stolen data from a commercial high quality scan. If the artists were behind a server hack, the legal ramifications for them are much more serious than scanning the object, which has few, if any legal precedents.

What do you think? Will we ever know? Nefertiti’s data liberation has certainly sparked some controversy and I look forward to seeing what the community creates from it, as well as what truths come out as the story unfolds!

 

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Explorations of Processes for Digitally Created Glass Castings

I spent much of 2015 taking a year long flexible fellowship at Wheaton Arts’ Creative Glass Center of America developing ways to cast glass from computer generated sculptural forms and wanted to take some time to share these learnings. I worked extensively with glass many years ago but now create most of my art with 3D scanning and printing. The Wheaton Arts’ fellowship was a unique opportunity to bring these two practices back together.

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Wheaton Arts is home to the Creative Glass Center of America in Millville, NJ, where I had a fellowship this past year to conduct experiments and create a workflow for casting glass from computer designed objects.

My work in the last few years has used a combination of 3D modeling techniques. I usually begin with 3D scanning,  primarily structured light scanning with Primesense/Kinect style devices and occasionally photogrammetry for non human subjects. Other non-organic forms are just modeled directly in the computer using my software of choice Zbrush. Next I will digitally manipulate and sculpt the 3D scans in the computer. Finally the work is output as a 3D print. My investigations this year took these techniques further, so that these digital sculpts were then realized as cast glass forms. I tried a few variations of lost PLA casting, as well as CNC milling graphite to make reusable molds. Enjoy.

Lost PLA Kiln Casting

The first technique I chose to explore is what people are calling “Lost PLA”, basically an evolution of the traditional lost wax kiln casting technique. Starting with a 3D printed positive of the form I want to cast in glass, I created a plaster/silica mold around my 3D print.

The actual recipe for the mold by weight was:

  • 16  parts water
  • 6 parts Hydroperm
  • 6 parts Plaster
  • 6 parts Silica (or olivine sand)
  • 1  cup 3/4″ fiberglass strand

This could be done with just a 50/50% plaster-silica mix, but as I understand it the Hydroperm foams and creates air pockets in the molds to make them lighter. The fiberglass strand helps strengthen the mold and helps wick out the moisture so the molds dry more efficiently.

I began by plugging any holes in the surface of the 3D prints with microcrystalline wax and waxing the prints down to a table. I then just cut strips of tar paper and hot glued them down to form a wall around the print, leaving room for about 3″ of mold thickness. I mixed a small initial coat of mix with no fiberglass strand to use as a splash coat over the object, then mixed subsequent buckets of mix to fill the molds completely. After the mold was filled, I let it set before tipping the molds on their sides to dry (having fans helped this).

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3D Print affixed to the table with wax and surrounded by a cylinder of tar paper

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3D prints and tar paper prepped for casting molds

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Splash coat on the 3D print

 

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Mold ingredients being dry mixed before the water is added

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Completed molds drying

After a minimum of one day drying (and preferably more like a week), the molds were ready to be loaded into the ovens. The PLA was still on the inside and needed to be melted out. With lost wax casting, the general practice is to steam the wax out of a mold. I tried this with the 3D printed PLA and barely got it to move at all. Steaming out PLA is not an option so it has to be burned out in an oven.

Even though PLA is a biodegradable corn starch, the burnout is smoky and not good to be around so it had to be timed to happen overnight when the studio was empty. I would begin by soaking the oven at 300˚ for about three hours and then pushing it upwards at about 100˚/hour. At about 450˚ I would go in (wearing gloves, glasses and a respirator) and use pliers to pull out some big chunks of plastic as it started melting. I had to be careful not to damage the mold in doing so. At about 700˚, I would go in with a stainless steel turkey baster and suck out as much molten plastic as possible. The oven would then go to 1000˚ for an hour and be fully burned out. Because burn out in an oven is pretty nasty smelling at its peak and I can’t really recommend it as a best practice. However, I just became aware of Moldlay– a 3D printing filament designed for lost wax casting. It’s expensive but I would like to check it out.

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Mold mid burnout

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Molds at 1000˚F after burnout

From there I tried two basic approaches to casting into the plaster molds. The first technique involved putting molten glass from a furnace directly into the molds. The second involved cooling the molds back down, packing them with chunks of crystal glass, then firing them to melting point. Each techniques has its strengths and weaknesses.

Lost PLA Kiln Casting Technique 1- “Hot Glass Lacrosse Casting”

Since buying crystal to kiln cast with is very expensive, I was trying to be more cost effective by using the readily available furnace glass to cast with. Basically, after the mold was burned out I would soak it at 1000˚ for several hours to burn out any chemical water, and then we would ladle glass directly into the molds. I found that even after I soaked the molds 10-12 hours at 1000˚, the chemical water in the plaster would still cause the glass to bubble up as we poured the glass in. We then resorted to a technique we called Lacrosse Casting. I would gather a ladle of glass, then dump the ladle into a second ladle someone else was holding. They would rock the ladle side to side so that the molten glass skinned up on the outside a little. They would then dump that back into my ladle and I would go to the oven and gingerly drop this “hot tamale” of glass into the mold. The center of the glass was still quite hot but the skinned up exterior was less likely to bubble. Unfortunately the molds are quite fragile and this can cause damage if there are a lot of delicate details to the mold. After the mold was filled, the oven would be sent up to about 1500-1600˚ to make the flatten out and flow into the mold. As soon as the glass flattened, the oven was crashed back down to under 1000˚ and an annealing cycle began.

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Passing off ladles full of molten glass in order to cool the exterior of the glass before dropping it in the fragile molds

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The 2300˚ “lacrosse” pass

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Dropping glass into the mold

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Crashing the oven after it reaches 1600˚F and the glass has flattened out

Issues with this technique

  • This process takes a lot of time! I was casting forms that took 2+ days to print, then there was mold making, casting and annealing.
  • The plaster molds are extremely fragile and can easily be damaged by the glass as it is dropped in the mold. This results with imperfect castings that often have bits of plaster encased in the glass.
  • If the ladles are not very clean, the glass will often have veiling from the ladle surface. Bubbles are also often introduced resulting in a very bubbly glass. In my case I liked the underwater look this gave.
  • Devitrification is a crystalizing of glass that happens at approximately 1200 degrees, making the surface of the glass fog up. Soda lime glass (Spruce Pine batch) is particularly vulnerable to this. In my case, if there was not enough radiant heat above the top of the mold and it took too long for the oven to heat up for the glass to level out in the mold, the surface would fog up.

Sample Castings (Unfinished work)

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Death (work in progress) 14″x 14″x 6″

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Creation (work in progress) 14″ x 14″ x 5″

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Untitled work in progress 14″ x 14″ x 4″

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The Gates of Heaven 24″x 19″x 5″

 

Lost PLA Kiln Casting Technique 2- Kiln Casting

The issues with molds being damaged by hot glass and devitrification lead me to acquire some crystal to kiln cast with. Casting crystal is expensive and usually formulated to not devitrify so in general this technique delivers more optically pure castings. I tried two glass formulas for kiln casting; Uroboros Glass’ system 96  and Schott optical crystal.

After the mold is burned out, I would let the oven slowly return to room temperature so I could carefully vacuum it out and pack it with chunks of glass (My glass came in large tiles so I cleaned the surface with alcohol and then used a torch to shatter them.

Bang! #glass @wheatonarts

A post shared by fredini (@fredini) on

The small chunks could then be loaded in the mold, and the oven slowly brought back up to about 1550˚ until they melted in completely and the worst of the bubbles came to the surface. At that point the oven was crashed back down to under 1000˚ and the glass is annealed (slowly brought to room temperature).

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Loading chunks of crystal into the mold

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Close up of mold and crystal chunks. I like how the mold picked up the layer lines from the 3D print.

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The oven is ready to be heated back up

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At about 1550-1600˚F, the glass is molten and flowing into the mold

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Its a delicate balance how long to keep the mold hot. You want to get the bubbles to rise to the surface, but also want to stop before the glass begins to devitrify and fog on the surface.

  • This technique definitely yielded the best casting results for Lost PLA
  • More expensive- both in the time consuming process, oven time and  most significantly the cost of the casting crystal
  • Devitrification can still be an issue, depending upon the glass used
  • The final casting still requires extensive grinding, polishing and finishing work
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Angel/Mermaid (work in progress) 14″ x 14″ x 6″

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Funny Face (work in progress) 14″ x 14″x 6″

Hot Glass Casting into CNC milled graphite molds

I quickly realized that the lost PLA technique was time consuming and disconnected from all the excitement and spontaneity that I associate with hot glass work. Lost PLA castings also required extensive work divesting from the mold, then grinding and polishing. I had long wanted to experiment with CNC carving as opposed to 3D printing, and set out to experiment with milling graphite to create reusable molds as a more cost effective approach for casting glass with.

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CNC milled graphite molds for glass casting; rough pass carving with 1/4″ endmill, finished mold cut with 1/8″ ball mill, molten glass in the mold and annealed, cooled glass casting

I decided to purchase the Inventables XCarve  because it is an open source CNC machine, and I wanted to support Inventables great work in making CNC software more user friendly. I opted for the 1000mm version with the heavy duty Nema 23  motors and Dewalt 611 spindle which has enough power to even mill aluminum. I had a lot of trepidation about building a kit as some of the 3D printer kits I had built in the past were not well documented, but Inventables documentation was excellent and it worked pretty well right off the bat. A few support calls and posts on the message boards got me through the few small hiccoughs that I did encounter.

However, I was concerned about milling graphite as the dust is electrically conductive. If that dust got all over as I was using the machine, not only would it make a mess, it could also fry the Xcarve Arduino controller, and even the laptop driving the setup. I had no choice but to rig up a robust dust collection system. I ended up buying a dust shoe from KentCNC to mount around the spindle (Yes, I could have made my own but was running out of time at Wheaton by then). This then attached to a Dust Deputy cyclonic dust collector and a shop vacuum. The result was a powerful dust collection system that captures nearly all the graphite coming off the spindle as it cuts, and 95% of it ends up in my new favorite tool, the Dust Deputy.

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The newly assembled X-Carve, still in need of some wire management

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Unlike 3D printing, CNC milling has the machine doing multiple passes. Shown here is the rough pass, done with a 1/4″ endmill.

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The finished mold, cut with a 1/8″ ball mill

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The big test… Trying out the mold for the first time!

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Torching the glass as it sets up in the mold

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It looks amazing!

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The final result- a cast glass tile from a mold that will stand up to hundreds of castings!

Coming out of the last year of experiments, I’m most excited about this process as it has a lot of potential for small run computer designed glass objects and custom tiles for architectural use. There are some design restrictions in that molds cannot have undercuts and the Xcarve can only cut about 2 1/2″ at the deepest, but because these molds can be quickly and comparatively cheaply generated and used to create cost effective editions, I think this approach has a lot of promise. I look forward to continuing to experiment with these techniques as I share them with my class this June at the Pilchuck Glass School.

 

Greetings From Pilchuck!

I’ve just completed two weeks as a visiing artist at the Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, Washington. It’s been 21 years since I have been here and I’m happy to say that Artistic Director Tina Aufiero is doing a great job of pushing the school forward into the 21st century while maintaining the atmosphere of collaboration, comraderie, experimentation and creativity. 

I was brought out to get the new 3D printing studio space set up in preparation for classes this year, and to plan my 2016 class on using digital processes and 3DP for creation of glass objects. It was an awesome experience and much needed moment of reflection. I was able to generate some work in preparation for the upcoming Wheaton Arts fellowship and even got to dabble in glassmaking while making new friends and reconnecting with old ones.  

Here’s some images: 

The iconic Pilchuck Hot Shop

    

Hank Adams’ Trojan Horse has grown a wonderful patina over the years

        

as Always, the hot shop was bustling with action- pulling glass tubes for neon here

  

Sunset over Puget Sound as seen from the lodge

  

“Creation” 3D Print- a maquette for my Wheaton Project? Picture this 12′ tall! Made on the new Printrbot Bot Farm.

  

Gaffer Dan Friday helped me make a piece, starting with this gold Ruby glass heart

  

Hot glass is a seductive material

  

This 3D printed scan if my hand was inspiration for this hot glass sculpted piece

  

Hand with heart being reheated in the glory hole.

  

The Heart in the hand

  

Il Cavallo- the glass Horse: I see the glass horse as the ultimate test of glassblowing prowess. what the paper crane is to Origami, il cavallo is to glass. if you can work hot enough to make the horse without reheating, you are a skilled glassworker. Watch my YouTube olaylist of Glass Horse making here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZroWUSkyKpFH_TNnoYe2JcpZcVCiRBcC

  

Pilchuck Totem Pole made by Preston Singletary and other pacific Northwest natives with cast glass inclusions

        

My last night ended with a gallery show. of 3D printed and glass work

 

Creation Maquettes

  

3D Portraits

  

Portrait of Artist in Residence Joel Otterson

      

Glass hand holding Heart

  

Dan Friday Portrait

  

Il Cavallo

  

Goodbye Pilchuck! im excited to teach session 2 , 2016!

  

Bay Area Maker Faire Talk: Fredini’s History of Technology as Entertainment

Its been a whirlwind ever since I went out to San Francisco for Maker Faire. I meant to post a recap of some of my favorite highlights of the weekend, but have been swamped with Scan-A-Rama and getting ready for this year’s fellowship at Wheaton Arts. This week I’m doing a quick visiting artist stint at the Pilchuck Glass School to get a 3D printing studio up and running. I’ll be teaching a course there next summer about methods of creating 3D printed models for glass casting… more on that later (but I’ll be looking for artistic teaching assistants with expertise in 3D printer building, 3D modeling and glass casting, so give me a shout if you’re interested!).

In the meantime, Maker Faire posted my talk on YouTube. Overall, I’m happy with it. I confess I was called out by a fan for screwing up the Arthur C. Clarke quote, which should read “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.“. Anyway, here’s the talk, and if you get a chance its just one of a playlist of a lot of great pieces, so check them all out!

PLA Perdue Part Two

Yesterday I posted about my experiments with “lost PLA” casting to make a cast glass object from a 3D printed digital design.

Today the oven cooled and I was able to remove them from the plaster silica molds. I’m quite pleased with the results. They could use some cold working to grind and polish them, but it’s an excellent proof of concept for this as an efficient and speedy workflow to quickly move from digital designs to physical object in any castable material including glass and metal.

Some shots of disinvestment and the final objects. The castings were very clean!

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R&D: Developing a Workflow for taking Digital 3D Designs to Glass Objects

Greetings from beautiful Millville NJ! I’m down here for a few days at Wheaton Arts’ Creative Glass Center of America, where I had an artist in residency way back in 1992. My friends Jim Harmon and Hank Adams invited me down to prototype a workflow for taking digital 3D designs to glass objects. Take a look and see what I’ve been up to!

The TC Wheaton Glass Building at Wheaton Arts

The TC Wheaton Glass Building at Wheaton Arts

The Studio is a recreation of an 1880's Glass facotory and hosts world acclaimed artists coming to realize their work in glass.

The Studio is a recreation of an 1880’s Glass facotory and hosts world acclaimed artists coming to realize their work in glass.

I chose this Duchamp Chess Set Pawn (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:305639) as a simple form to test how PLA prints will fare burning out of plaster molds.

I chose this Duchamp Chess Set Pawn (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:305639) as a simple form to test how PLA prints will fare burning out of plaster molds. I wanted to have something with a wide bottom so we could easily inspect the interior of our mold. I am curious to see how much residue PLA 3D prints will leave behind when burned out of a plaster mold.

I used some wax to seal any  holes in the PLA Print, and then used a cardboard box to prep a form for casting plaster around the object. Note that I used some clay to fashion a resevoir/base for the 3D print.

I used some wax to seal any holes in the Print, and then used a cardboard box to prep a form for casting plaster around the object. Note that I used some clay to fashion a reservoir/base for the 3D print.

I mixed a 50/50 mixture of pottery plaster and sIlica as the mold will need to be fired to 1500 degrees Fahrenheit.

I mixed a 50/50 mixture of pottery plaster and sIlica- this is a standard formula for glass casting as the mold will need to be fired to 1500 degrees Fahrenheit.

I gave the form a wet splash coat of plaster first.

I gave the form a wet splash coat of plaster first.

I was nervous about the piece floating off the bottom so the splash coat was there to anchor it, then as the plaster becan to set I added more in on top.

I was nervous about the piece floating off the bottom of the box, so the splash coat was there to anchor it and capture the surface. As the plaster began to set I added more in on top.

Later Jim and I removed the castings from the cardboard and dug out the clay resevoir.

After the plaster set, Jim and I removed the castings from the cardboard and dug out the clay reservoir.

The PLA 3D print is just visible inside. Next up we loaded these molds in an overn and slowly brought them to 500 degrees, then all the way up to 1000 to completely burn off the PLA.

The PLA 3D print is just visible inside the plaster mold. Next up, we loaded these molds in an oven and slowly brought them to 500 degrees, then all the way up to 1000 to completely burn off the PLA overnight.

The burned out mold was perfectly clean in the morning.

The burned out mold was perfectly clean in the morning.

Next up, the molds were flipped and loaded with chunks of glass cullet.

Next up, the molds were flipped and loaded with chunks of glass cullet.

We picked chunks that were clear and as big as we could fit in the resevoir. This will help the casting be clear with fewer bubbles.

We picked chunks that were clear and as big as we could fit in the reservoir. This will help the casting be clear with fewer bubbles.

Ready for firing!

Ready for firing!

Jim programmed the oven to slowly heat to 900°, then climb up to 1500° as quick as possible, then hold there for four hours.

Jim programmed the oven to slowly heat to 900°, then climb up to 1500° as quick as possible, then hold there for four hours.

At that point the glass was all melted into the mold and we cracked the oven to "crash" it back down to the annealing temperature of 900° before the glass devitrifies.

At that point the glass was all melted into the mold and we cracked the oven to “crash” it back down to the annealing temperature of 900° before the glass devitrifies.

The oven was pretty hot!

The oven was pretty hot!

We are soaked the oven at annealing temperatures of 900° and 720° on the way down. Hopefully the pieces will be cool enough to remove from the oven before I leave tomorrow! Stay tuned to see how the castings come out- I can hardly wait to see myself!

UPDATE: See how everything came out here: https://thegreatfredini.com/2014/07/26/pla-perdue-part-two/