Young Love in Coney Island!

This past Saturday, I had the opportunity to make 3d scanned portraits of two young couples from Staten Island. It was very sweet to see young love at work. I’m quite pleased with these scans and will be printing them today. They were young but the girls were hopeful about them one day being used as a wedding cake topper! MikeJessica2-PRINT

AlexaAragona-Patric2-PRINT

Getting Ahead with #3DScanning

Last Spring, my friend and Julliard Propmaster Kate Dale had me scan one of their actors for a production of Richard III. The character Hastings is beheaded in the play and they used the Julliard CNC machine to create his head in foam from a 3D scan that I made of him. I was recently up at the prop shop and was able to see the end result. I thought it would be cool to share some process shots here.

We began by creating a 3D scan of the actor's head

We began by creating a 3D scan of the actor’s head which I turned into a watertight STL file.

At the Prop shop, Kate CNC milled sheets of foam and built the head. They put a brick in the center to give it the correct weight.

At the Julliard prop shop, Kate CNC milled sheets of foam and built the head in layers. They put a brick in the center to give it the correct weight.

After being painted and having a wig glued on, it was super realistic and gory!

After Kate painted it and glued a wig on, it was super realistic and gory!

 

Here I am with the Head of Hastings!

Here I am with the final Head of Hastings!

PLA Perdue Part Two

Yesterday I posted about my experiments with “lost PLA” casting to make a cast glass object from a 3D printed digital design.

Today the oven cooled and I was able to remove them from the plaster silica molds. I’m quite pleased with the results. They could use some cold working to grind and polish them, but it’s an excellent proof of concept for this as an efficient and speedy workflow to quickly move from digital designs to physical object in any castable material including glass and metal.

Some shots of disinvestment and the final objects. The castings were very clean!

20140726-004622-2782486.jpg

20140726-004721-2841806.jpg

20140726-004722-2842171.jpg

20140726-004722-2842703.jpg

20140726-004723-2843030.jpg

20140726-004723-2843348.jpg

20140726-004723-2843978.jpg

R&D: Developing a Workflow for taking Digital 3D Designs to Glass Objects

Greetings from beautiful Millville NJ! I’m down here for a few days at Wheaton Arts’ Creative Glass Center of America, where I had an artist in residency way back in 1992. My friends Jim Harmon and Hank Adams invited me down to prototype a workflow for taking digital 3D designs to glass objects. Take a look and see what I’ve been up to!

The TC Wheaton Glass Building at Wheaton Arts

The TC Wheaton Glass Building at Wheaton Arts

The Studio is a recreation of an 1880's Glass facotory and hosts world acclaimed artists coming to realize their work in glass.

The Studio is a recreation of an 1880’s Glass facotory and hosts world acclaimed artists coming to realize their work in glass.

I chose this Duchamp Chess Set Pawn (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:305639) as a simple form to test how PLA prints will fare burning out of plaster molds.

I chose this Duchamp Chess Set Pawn (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:305639) as a simple form to test how PLA prints will fare burning out of plaster molds. I wanted to have something with a wide bottom so we could easily inspect the interior of our mold. I am curious to see how much residue PLA 3D prints will leave behind when burned out of a plaster mold.

I used some wax to seal any  holes in the PLA Print, and then used a cardboard box to prep a form for casting plaster around the object. Note that I used some clay to fashion a resevoir/base for the 3D print.

I used some wax to seal any holes in the Print, and then used a cardboard box to prep a form for casting plaster around the object. Note that I used some clay to fashion a reservoir/base for the 3D print.

I mixed a 50/50 mixture of pottery plaster and sIlica as the mold will need to be fired to 1500 degrees Fahrenheit.

I mixed a 50/50 mixture of pottery plaster and sIlica- this is a standard formula for glass casting as the mold will need to be fired to 1500 degrees Fahrenheit.

I gave the form a wet splash coat of plaster first.

I gave the form a wet splash coat of plaster first.

I was nervous about the piece floating off the bottom so the splash coat was there to anchor it, then as the plaster becan to set I added more in on top.

I was nervous about the piece floating off the bottom of the box, so the splash coat was there to anchor it and capture the surface. As the plaster began to set I added more in on top.

Later Jim and I removed the castings from the cardboard and dug out the clay resevoir.

After the plaster set, Jim and I removed the castings from the cardboard and dug out the clay reservoir.

The PLA 3D print is just visible inside. Next up we loaded these molds in an overn and slowly brought them to 500 degrees, then all the way up to 1000 to completely burn off the PLA.

The PLA 3D print is just visible inside the plaster mold. Next up, we loaded these molds in an oven and slowly brought them to 500 degrees, then all the way up to 1000 to completely burn off the PLA overnight.

The burned out mold was perfectly clean in the morning.

The burned out mold was perfectly clean in the morning.

Next up, the molds were flipped and loaded with chunks of glass cullet.

Next up, the molds were flipped and loaded with chunks of glass cullet.

We picked chunks that were clear and as big as we could fit in the resevoir. This will help the casting be clear with fewer bubbles.

We picked chunks that were clear and as big as we could fit in the reservoir. This will help the casting be clear with fewer bubbles.

Ready for firing!

Ready for firing!

Jim programmed the oven to slowly heat to 900°, then climb up to 1500° as quick as possible, then hold there for four hours.

Jim programmed the oven to slowly heat to 900°, then climb up to 1500° as quick as possible, then hold there for four hours.

At that point the glass was all melted into the mold and we cracked the oven to "crash" it back down to the annealing temperature of 900° before the glass devitrifies.

At that point the glass was all melted into the mold and we cracked the oven to “crash” it back down to the annealing temperature of 900° before the glass devitrifies.

The oven was pretty hot!

The oven was pretty hot!

We are soaked the oven at annealing temperatures of 900° and 720° on the way down. Hopefully the pieces will be cool enough to remove from the oven before I leave tomorrow! Stay tuned to see how the castings come out- I can hardly wait to see myself!

UPDATE: See how everything came out here: http://thegreatfredini.com/2014/07/26/pla-perdue-part-two/

Pink Poodle Lady Mermaid Parade 3D Scan

Kate "The Pink Poodle Lady", Fifi the Mermaid poodle and Phinn the fish, 3D Scanned at the 2014 Mermaid Parade

Kate “The Pink Poodle Lady”, Fifi the Mermaid poodle and Phinn the fish, 3D Scanned at the 2014 Mermaid Parade

At the Mermaid Parade this year, I had the opportunity to 3D scan Kate Dale, the “Pink Poodle Lady”. Last week Kate called me and invited me up to Julliard (where she is the prop master), to 3D scan her entire float before it had to be dismantled. I tried several times to use the Sense scanner to capture it, but the scan wasn’t quite ideal. For example, the fish Phinn’s scales were not showing up and there were a number of seams. It would have been a lot of zbrushing to fix it. So I pulled out my iPhone and used 123dCatch. The results are great! I may pull out the Sense scans and use some details from them to add further embellishments- for example the clamshell footlights, but really I’m quite pleased with the result!

20140716-232554-84354904.jpg

20140716-232554-84354494.jpg

3D Printed Wedding Cake Topper Spotting

My friends Thea and Justin were married yesterday. It was a wonderful event. My gift to them was a Scan-A-Rama 3D printed wedding cake topper of themselves. It looked beautiful on top of the cake. It’s not the first one of these I’ve done but it was the first one I’ve been to the actual wedding to see. Congrats to Thea and Justin!

20140713-121740-44260473.jpg

20140713-121741-44261343.jpg

20140713-121740-44260917.jpg